The Traitor’s Niche

By ,

The book opens at the heart of the Ottoman Empire. We are in a square in the ancient Imperial capital; and in this square, in the stonework of the Cannon Gate, has been carved a niche. In this niche is a severed head. The book revolves around the inhabitants of the niche—the current, historical, and potential occupants, plus Abdullah and the Doctor, the civil servants charged with maintaining the integrity of the grisly relics, and the corrupt courier whose job it is to speed newly decapitated heads to their care.

Each of the vignettes is sympathetically done. The baroque madness of the Ottoman bureaucracy is beautifully drawn, and the characters are sketched well. Each time you find yourself hoping against hope that you aren’t meeting the next occupant of the niche. But I missed a narrative thread; the niche itself wasn’t enough of a unifying theme. I wanted something more: to know what brought each person to the point where the threat of the niche, or the consequences of a beheading, transformed their stories. I felt throughout that I was missing something with the allegorical nature of the story relating to Albania’s troubled history.

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Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Century

Price
(UK) £16.99

ISBN
(UK) 9781846558450

Format
Hardback

Pages
198

Review

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