Pinkerton’s Gold

By

In post-Civil War Colorado, the Guggenheim Mining Company’s gold shipments are being robbed. The Pinkerton Detective Agency is engaged to apprehend the outlaws, and ace detective Lord John Whyte is assigned to the job. John had served in India, and his loyal manservant, Khan Singh, had followed him to America and fought in the Union army alongside him in the Civil War. John’s team resides in Denver in John’s plush rail car and rides out on investigative missions. Belle, an attractive Irish bawdy-house owner, assists John, impressing him not only with her intellect but also with her charisma.

This is an uncommon Western novel, which has the normal barroom brawls, killings, and shootouts, and a romantic slant as well. The addition of Indian Sikh servants and farmworkers, at this time in American history, is another unusual facet. While their legendary fighting skills are aptly demonstrated, readers will be amused when they address others as “sahib” and “memsahib” and cook Indian curry for diners’ enjoyment. The detectives employ the methods normally available in those days in tracking, identifying, and capturing the outlaws, and they also invent some ingenious ones. These are ably dramatized to keep readers engrossed.

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Details

Online Exclusive

Publisher

Published

Genre

Century

Price
(US) $25.95

ISBN
(US) 9781432837341

Format
Hardback

Pages
274

Review

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