Pamela Schoenewaldt

About me

My first two historical novels, WHEN WE WERE STRANGERS (HarperCollins, 2011) and SWIMMING IN THE MOON (HarperCollins, 2013) deal with the immigration experience, worker justice, women’s issues, and treatment of mental illness. My interest in immigration comes from the 10 years I lived in Italy and fascination with the challenge, the strange pleasures, and the displacement of being “a stranger.” Now I live in Knoxville, TN (a displaced Northerner) with my husband Maurizio, a physicist, and Jesse, the dog.
My academic background is Renaissance literature, and for many years I wrote short stories for pleasure while working as a professional writer of scripts, speeches, articles, and brochures. I’ve taught writing at the University of Maryland, European Division and the University of Tennessee where I was writer in residence.

From my website

Call me names!

When I was about two, my mother said I invented a game called “Names.” The rules were simple: she regaled me with terms of endearment while I basked in the glow of Honey, Sugar, Sugar Pie, Sweetheart, Sweet Pea, Sugar Plum, Pumpkin, Pumpkin Pie, Honey Pie, Honey Bun, Baby Cake,…

Is it better than your mother’s?

When I was a child, grammar descended on me in Barbetta, a grand (to me) Italian restaurant in NYC. I must have been about eight. I was the only child in the room, which gave the event both solemnity and anxiety. I was instructed to be on my best behavior.…

When Point of View exercises get personal

I’ll be leading a workshop on Point of View for the Knoxville Writers Guild (more on that here). In years of teaching college fiction classes, I’ve found that Point of View units can have dramatic personal impacts. Once again, art shapes life. I’d like to share three instances. Coming Out…

 
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