With Scott in the Antarctic: Edward Wilson: Explorer, Naturalist, Artist

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Williams dramatizes Edward Wilson from his early childhood to his death in Antarctica. Wilson traveled to the unchartered frontier at the South Pole on two expeditions, first the Discovery and later the ill fated Terra Nova. As a young boy, he struggled with an explosive temper, yet he matured into a quiet, unassuming naturalist and artist who advanced in the medical field. Joining the expedition to Antarctica was the perfect job for him. Williams does an excellent job of shaping the image of Wilson by using diaries of his colleagues and his own personal journals which provide vivid details – nothing spared.

Wilson believed time was our most precious gift, not money. His devotion and spiritual faith was limitless. His soul mate and wife, Oriana, was always with him despite their physical separation. Williams captures the essence of this unique explorer who felt that “ordinary day to day life should not need planning and worrying, but rather, grateful acceptance.” In reading about Wilson, you see his ambition was not in the ultimate destination, but in the knowledge he gained and the richness of his life each day. Minor editing of repetitive sections would enhance this otherwise brilliant biography of a remarkable explorer. Highly recommended.

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(US) 9780750948791

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336

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