The Warrior

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Set in the 4th century BC, The Warrior is the last installment in an historical trilogy. This book focuses on Alexander, who may or may not be the son of Alexander the Great. He sets off to Egypt to wed a princess, the daughter of Ptolemy. But there, palace intrigue abounds; Alexander meets a slave girl, Kiara, who saves his life and draws him into her own schemes. There are also several subplots involving Alexander’s family.

Although this book is categorized as “historical,” readers looking for a story which explores the possibility that Alexander the Great’s son was not murdered at an early age, but instead lived, will not find that story here. This Alexander’s lineage is never addressed; Ptolemy himself claims that “whether or not this Alexander is my nephew and heir to my brother’s kingdom isn’t important.”

Historical inaccuracies aside, most of the characters are lightweight and poorly developed (e.g., an eight-year-old girl’s point-of-view voice should be distinct from that of a young man’s, but it isn’t), and the plot far-fetched. Ultimately, the many storylines fail to be gripping; for this reader, this is a below average read, and one that may have worked better as a fantasy than a historical.

 

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Price
(US) $6.99
(CA) $8.99

ISBN
(US) 0843953950

Format
Paperback

Pages
358

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