The Silence of God

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A family with eight children and the neighbor girl Natasha struggle through the violent events of the early part of the 20th century as the only Mormon family in Russia. They desert from the tsar’s army on the western front; some become avid Bolsheviks, some are sent to Siberia for clinging to their faith throughout an atheistic revolution. We even get an almost first-hand view of the death of the tsar and his family.

Under the Mormon Church’s signature publishing house, this is definitely a book geared to the Latter-Day Saint audience. For the first couple of chapters, I doubted whether it would appeal to any other readers. The sensitive drawing of Natasha’s character, however, saves the day from the distant writing that sometimes keeps us from involvement with the family. Now, having reached the conclusion, I can recommend this to anyone with an interest in the time and place. I only wish the footnotes which accompany nearly every chapter had not told me of the family’s real fate. Thank heaven for fiction.

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Details

Publisher

Published

Genre
,

Period

Century

Price
(US) $24.99

ISBN
(US) 9781606416556

Format
Hardback

Pages
376

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