The Red Queen’s Daughter

By

Often a cover initially draws us to a book, but as we all know you “can’t judge a book by its cover”. Well, in this case you actually can. The red-haired girl’s gaze draws you to open the book, and after you begin Jacqueline Kolosov’s text you’ll be completely snared.

Mary Seymour was the only daughter of Thomas Seymour and Catherine Parr, widow of King Henry VIII. Catherine Parr died from complications of the birth, and Thomas Seymour was executed a year later. Mary’s life disappears from the historical record after 1550, but Kolosov has picked it up and imagined an intriguing life for Mary within the court of Queen Elizabeth, her mother’s own stepdaughter.

Mary is warmly received by the Queen, but soon finds court life dangerous. Her mission is to become a white magician and secure the success of Elizabeth’s reign, but finds her biggest threat is her attractive cousin, the black magician, Edmund Seymour. Mary comes to realize that light cannot exist without dark and finds her beliefs tested.

With a nod to Shakespeare’s King Lear, Kolosov artfully crafts a spellbinding tale. Fans of Philippa Gregory and Libba Bray will devour The Red Queen’s Daughter and add the book to their list of favorites. Ages 12 and up.

Share this review
Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $16.99

ISBN
(US) 1423107977

Format
Hardback

Pages
416

Review

Appeared in

Reviewed by