The Quiller Memorandum

By

Originally published in 1966 under the title The Berlin Memorandum, this is the first in the famous Quiller series, which eventually went on to number nineteen books.

Quiller is a secret agent, or in these cases a shadow executive for an extremely covert British intelligence bureau that doesn’t officially exist. Quiller, worn out and almost beaten-in by his years as a clandestine agent in a German concentration camp (where he meets his vile adversary Zossen), is now in Berlin a few years after the war and awaiting his return home. He is persuaded to stay when the “Bureau” informs him of Zossen’s plans to bring the Nazis back to power.

What follows is pure espionage written in top and classic form. The writing, though dated at times, is crisp, deadly and evocative. Quiller is a complex character written for intelligent readers who want to reflect and reason while they ponder the plot. Nothing is handed over, and the reader works for each climatic moment. This is espionage fiction at its most untainted, and Hall fills it with action and tense moments of suspense.

The Quiller Memorandum proves a winner for any decade.

 

 

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Published

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Period

Century

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(US) $24.95
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ISBN
(US) 076530967X

Format
Paperback

Pages
220

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