The Queen’s Sword

By

David Glenn’s two new novels, both mysteries, take place in the later years of Queen Elizabeth I’s court as the main detective, Sir Michael de Subermore, along with his sidekick, George Monty, endeavor to solve cases assigned to them by Sir Robert Cecil, main advisor to the queen and son of the famous Lord Burghley.

In the second book, The Queen’s Sword, these sleuths team up again in a prequel to the other story. Here, we see how Sir Subermore and Master Monty meet when they are called to London to investigate a plot to assassinate the queen. Subermore must infiltrate the rebels and uncover their plans. As he deals with plots and counterplots, he finds time to fall in love with the lady Amelia.

Both books are action-packed but, unfortunately, the writer uses different dialects in the dialogue, making the reading a tough go for those unfamiliar with Elizabethan expressions and Cockney accents. It is a bit like reading Mark Twain – possible, but the language seems dated and thus, the books lose some of their effect. However, if you like mysteries and you like the Tudor world, you may find these your cup of tea exactly.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $19.95

ISBN
(US) 9781935585800

Format
Paperback

Pages
257

Review

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