The Convenient Marriage

By

Not Regency but the 1770s; revolution in the air has not penetrated the world of scented boudoirs. The ton follows a trend of extravagant couture, unrestrained drinking, the placing of preposterous bets and the lethal practice of dawn meetings for two. The book is early Heyer, but all the ingredients are there: ‘And I’m not saying it ain’t convenient,’ says the bride’s scapegrace brother. But how can it be of advantage to the handsome Earl of Rule? He is incredibly rich, pursued by every hopeful Mama with a marriageable daughter? Horry Winwood has nothing but an aristocratic name and a family of inveterate gamblers.

The Earl has enemies: dangerously attractive Lethbridge has an old score to settle and Drelincourt, cowardly and spiteful has counted on inheriting the Earldom. They focus on innocent Horry as a catspaw who has already taken to disastrous gambling. A divorce might serve the purpose, but they would prefer to see the Earl dead. Can Horry, warm hearted and wilful, preserve a marriage she increasingly values? Marcus, Earl of Rule, the ultimate of laid back sophistication, must keep his elegantly booted legs a step ahead of everyone else in this dangerous game of reckless frivolity and true love.

Accomplished and beguiling, the novel offers a bonus of laugh-out loud humour.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

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Classic

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Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(UK) £7.99

ISBN
(UK) 9780099585558

Format
Paperback

Pages
272

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