Streets of Warsaw

By

Bronislaw Pietrazewicz, code-named “Lot,” is a member of the Polish Underground fighting the Nazi occupiers in Warsaw. Bronek, as he is known, and his fellow members of the Underground cell “Agat” strike out at the Nazis despite brutal retaliation against innocent civilians. They have little choice. The Nazis have turned Warsaw into little more than a slave labor camp. Starvation and poverty abound. Hopelessness is rampant. The only shred of self-respect left to the citizens of Warsaw is given to them by the courageous defiance of the Underground.

My one nit to pick with this novel is the detail into which the author delves in painting this deeply disturbing image. Too many day-to-day trivialities slowed the pace of the book and made it too easy to put down. However, using the same attention to detail, the author shows he is adept at painting a vivid portrait of the unspeakable misery suffered by the Poles under Nazi rule. As a result, this is a dark and depressing story. Perhaps in that respect it is also an important one, for we should never be allowed to forget or gloss over the horrors wrought upon the world by Nazi fanaticism.

 

 

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Award-winning novel of the Great War.

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $19.95
(CA) $28.95

ISBN
(US) 0974543500

Format
Paperback

Pages
363

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