Sins Of The Innocent

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A reader of a European memoir set during World War II has certain expectations – intrigue, deprivation, narrow escapes from death and a cheer at the end for surviving. Sins of the Innocent provides these from a slightly different (and captivating) viewpoint – that of a French woman married to a German artist and living in Germany. Markovia writes of her time in Germany with a frankness and clarity that capture the imagination. What follows is the story of a woman – suspected of spying for the Allies and left alone after her husband is drafted – who struggles to survive in Germany. This well-written and touching book is a gem. Marokvia bears herself out to be a woman of strength and resourcefulness, as evidenced by her weekly interrogations by the local police chief. As the war’s end draws near, however, the writing becomes much more stark and at times a touch cold. Having said that, the ending does leave the reader breathing a sigh of relief for Marokvia and her husband, as well as wondering about her life over the last 55 years.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $24.95

ISBN
(US) 1932961259

Format
Hardback

Pages
288

Review

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