Rebels of Babylon

By

Major Jones has arrived in New Orleans during the height of the Civil War to solve a murder of a young woman. Unfortunately, he may soon have to consider who will solve his own murder. When he chases a young woman through the city streets only to become the one being chased, he is convinced that his desire to retire is a sound one.

Delectably, the story weaves voodoo with politics and personality with mystery. New Orleans has always been a city linked with lascivious behavior, a place where anything goes, and Parry’s spicy tale serves only to emphasize the city’s colorful past. Parry provides rich descriptions of numerous facets of New Orleans life in 1863, including amazing voodoo rituals and fascinating political intricacies.

I do not know if the greatest part of the book is the edge-of-your-seat action or the detailed description of the era. Hand-in-hand these two facets keep the reader enthralled. It is positively impossible to put the book down. Written in clear prose, the complexity of characters and plot succeed in making a wonderful tale. It is important to note that Parry, writing in the vernacular of the times, does not pull any punches and does not shrink from vivid descriptions of terrifying action. Anyone who loves the period, the place or just a romping great mystery has to read this book.

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Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $24.95
(CA) $34.95

ISBN
(US) 0060513926

Format
Hardback

Pages
320

Review

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