Rachel’s Promise

By

This is a wrenching story of a Russian-Jewish family fleeing the pogroms of the early 20th century, the second novel in a planned trilogy. Rachel’s father has been killed, and in this novel she and her mother and sister travel across Russia on the Trans-Siberian Railway, and on to Shanghai. Sarah leaves behind a young friend, Sergei, who despite being a Christian seems sympathetic to Sarah and her people. Sergei runs away from home, away from his father, a policeman, who takes part in the pogroms. The novel follows both young people in alternating chapters, fostering the impression that these two will somehow, in the third novel of the trilogy, find each other again. The reader looks forward to the next novel to continue the story, yet knowing that the story is only broken, not completed, somewhat weakens this as a stand-alone novel. Sanders combines her own family history with larger known historical events – the Russo-Japanese War, the organized strikes of pre-revolutionary Russia and the Jewish community that settled in Shanghai. The style, with its simple declarative sentences, makes this a fine choice for younger readers.

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Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $12.95

ISBN
(US) 9781927583142

Format
Paperback

Pages
273

Review

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