Pop Goes the Weasel: The Secret Meanings of Nursery Rhymes

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Seemingly innocent, nonsensical children’s rhymes that we may think were merely intended to amuse were, in reality, anything but. Many of the rhymes marked a point in history: for instance, Humpty Dumpty was the name of Charles I’s cannon employed in the siege of Colchester during the English Civil War. Lucy Locket was a London prostitute and the Grand Old Duke of York, Prince Frederick, was a son of George III and a blundering military commander who marched his men to the top of the hill at Toucoing where they were defeated.

Albert Jack shows that the rhymes are a means of preserving moments in history and so are still relevant today. In their time they were a means of transmitting the news of the day and their simple, easy to remember ditties have ensured their survival. Citing over 200 rhymes with their meanings and associations makes this book a treasure trove of information and sheer, light-hearted fun.

 

 

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

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(UK) £12.99

ISBN
(UK) 9781846141447

Format
Hardback

Pages
292

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