Penguin Guide to the Superstitions of Britain and Ireland

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From abracadabra to superstitions surrounding the yew tree, this comprehensive work details many well known as well as the more obscure superstitions that still affect our everyday lives. While it is plain good sense to avoid walking under a ladder, the majority of superstitions have no obvious rhyme or reason. Contrary to popular belief, the origins of most superstitions go back no further than the late 19th century. The earliest record of throwing the bridal bouquet was in 1952.

This is a fascinating book compiled by a Local Studies Librarian, Steve Roud, who has researched British folklore for over thirty years. He discusses what is meant by ‘superstition’ or ‘belief’ and why certain superstitions arose and how they have evolved through time. Many of the quirkier superstitions or sayings offer inspiration for an endless supply of storylines. The cover of this book should carry a serious warning notice because once opened it is impossible to put down.

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Price
(UK) £10.99

ISBN
(UK) 0140515127

Format
Paperback

Pages
532

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