Paper Woman

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Set during the American Revolution, Paper Woman follows Sophie Barton’s attempts to learn the truth behind the murders of her rebel father and two other men. But if running the printing press at her father’s newspaper in Alton, Georgia, isn’t already an inappropriate occupation for a lady, joining a group of concerned locals (including a notorious Frenchman, her womanizing brother, her former lover, and two Indians) on a cross-country journey should earn Sophie quite a reputation! A clever and resourceful woman, she quickly proves herself a capable associate. But even with the combined abilities of her team of friends, there is still much to fear from the redcoats behind them on the trail.

Suzanne Adair has provided a compelling array of characters, in particular the roguish adventurer Jacques le Coeuvre. Sophie herself isn’t exactly a run-of-the-mill heroine, having chocked up quite a past before we meet her. And she’s soon to be a grandmother. Before Sophie embarks on her adventure, a difficult decision concerning her future is put before her.

Adair’s interests in historical re-enactment serve her well in creating details necessary to bring the period to life. Paper Woman is an entertaining and well-paced novel, and Sophie Barton proves to be far more substantial than the title might suggest. I look forward to the upcoming sequel.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $19.95

ISBN
(US) 0978526511

Format
Paperback

Pages
288

Review

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