Midnight Plague

By

The fact that none of the warring nations in the Asian or European theaters of World War II used chemical warfare, a cruel weapon routinely used in World War I, was a welcome surprise to those who lived through this most awful of wars. Gregg Keizer brings this subject into play in his second novel of the Second World War, following the critically acclaimed The Longest Night. Frank Brink, an American physician, is ordered to leave his work developing antibiotics for Allied use to examine a young French resistance fighter’s claim that the Germans are working on pneumonic plague, a deadly agent which would frustrate any Allied invasion. Dr. Brink accompanies the French woman back to occupied France to find and destroy the test site for this plague. SS troops are meanwhile searching for the Allied team as they are well aware pneumonic plague represents the only viable card left in the Nazi deck. This is a vivid portrayal of a great might-have-been of World War II.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Period

Century

Price
(US) $24.95
(CA) $35.00

ISBN
(US) 0399153195

Format
Hardback

Pages
352

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