Messenger Of Truth

By

In 1931, psychologist and private inquiry agent Maisie Dobbs is hired by a young woman to investigate the death of her artist twin brother. Accident or murder? Maisie’s working method consists of getting to know the victim intimately to find the killer. This allows Winspear to go from London to Kent to explore an affluent artistic family, then move to the poor struggling veterans of post-World War I days. The social problems left by the war on the domestic and international fronts are an integral part of the plot, well-described by means of the various suspects and Maisie’s lower- class, East End assistant. We also glimpse the nature of the crimes specific to the era and the workings of the various police forces. Maisie is a complex character: a woman of her time, baggage-laden, self-sufficient, and prone to self-analysis. She never hesitates to question her decisions, whether professional or emotional, and is very attentive to the people she meets and how they affect her. The story is well structured and rather moving at times. Because of these traits, the novel should appeal to both mystery and general fiction readers alike.

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Details

Publisher
,

Published

Genre

Century

Price
(US) $24.00
(UK) £14.99

ISBN
(US) 0805078983
(UK) 0719567378

Format
Hardback

Pages
319

Review

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