Love Blooms in Winter

By

In 1892, Mae Wilkey is so worried about the welfare of her elderly neighbor, Pauline, that she leaps to the conclusion that the name “Tom Curtis” written on a piece of paper must be that of Pauline’s only living relative. Mae writes to Tom and demands that he come to Dwadlo, North Dakota, to look after his aunt. Tom, who works for a railroad in Chicago, does not think that he has any such relative, yet he sets off for North Dakota on the off-chance that there is truth to Mae’s claim.

I have only once seen a British pantomime. It was an unforgettable experience because the activities on stage were so ludicrously exaggerated that I couldn’t help but enjoy the show. I had the same feeling while reading this book: The basic premise is absurd, the townsfolk are quirky, and the mayhem continues to grow more and more ridiculous as the story progresses. Cats, dogs, elephants, and trains all run amok, time sequences don’t fit, and the characters behave inconsistently. However, once I relaxed, and didn’t try to take it seriously, this was a highly entertaining story. I am certain that Copeland’s fans will be equally delighted.

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Details

Publisher

Published

Genre
,

Period

Century

Price
(US) $13.99

ISBN
(US) 9780736930192

Format
Paperback

Pages
240

Review

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