Golden Girl

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Golden Girl is the second book in the American Fairy Trilogy. It continues the story of Carrie, a teenaged half-fae girl whose status as the object of a prophecy makes her sought after by both her grandparents, the King and Queen of the Unseelie Court; and the King of the Seelie Court, who keeps her parents hostage in a power grab. Carrie herself just wants to live a normal life with her mother and father, so she’s going undercover into Hollywood with her human friend Jack in search of the entrance to the Seelie Court. Unknown to Carrie, her attempts to gather information and rescue her parents generate far-reaching consequences for the human and fae worlds.

While I really enjoyed the first book in the trilogy for its originality and charm, I felt that there were some elements lacking in the second installment. As Carrie travelled from her Dust Bowl town and the alluring circus that masks the home of her grandparents’ court to the glittering world of Hollywood, the originality that had attracted me to these books in the first place seemed to be left behind as well. The plot became a lot more of what I would expect – Carrie makes some stupid decisions and gets herself into mess after mess, only to be bailed out by her handy-dandy love interest time and time again; there are whispers of a love triangle; and so on. I wouldn’t call it a total loss, and I’ll still be looking out for the third book – but I can’t deny that Golden Girl was a little disappointing.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Online Exclusive

Publisher

Published

Genre
,

Period

Century

Price
(US) $20.99

ISBN
(US) 9780375869396

Format
Hardback

Pages
297

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