Daughter of Deliverance

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To save her family from being sold into slavery to pay her father’s debts, Rahab of Jericho reluctantly becomes a prostitute. But when the Hebrew leader Joshua sends two spies into Jericho, Rahab meets and falls in love with both Ardon and his God. Rahab hides the spies from Jericho’s guards, and in return is promised that when Jericho falls, she and her family will be spared. After Jericho is destroyed, Rahab yearns to become a true follower of God, and to gain Ardon’s love. But can Ardon forgive Rahab’s sinful past?

Since I enjoyed Morris’s No Woman So Fair (about Sarah), Daughter of Deliverance was a disappointment. Historical glitches – coins in 1400 BC, for instance – aren’t as bad as the constant statement that God has given Canaan to the Hebrews, but they’ll have to conquer it themselves. (“Son, I’m giving you the neighbor’s new car, but you’ll have to steal it yourself.”) And Rahab incessantly says God is forgiving and compassionate; an odd statement considering the number of people God orders killed, some of them Hebrews. Rahab’s Story by Ann Burton and Unashamed by Francine Rivers are better versions of this tale.

 

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(US) $12.99

ISBN
(US) 0764229214

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Paperback

Pages
316

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