Boudica’s Last Stand: Britain’s Revolt Against Rome AD 60-61

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It is 60 A.D. Boudica, Queen of the Iceni and widow of Prasatagus, has formed a confederacy of tribes in order to drive out the Roman invaders. After decades of humiliations, abuses and Roman horrors perpetrated on the tribes and particularly on Boudica herself, the native tribes have decided to take up arms against their oppressor.

On the Roman side is the famed Roman governor and warrior, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, who awaits the tribal hordes after their victories over and obliteration of three pivotal Roman cities. Although Paulinus has a small army and the native forces far outnumber them, how can Paulinus develop a strategy to defeat the great army? If Paulinus loses to the natives, he will lose the province forever.

To answer these questions, Waite examines the revolt from a fresh, vastly different and tactical perspective. With considerable archaeological information at his disposal, the author produces a reinterpretation of the revolt, suggesting a different battle site based not merely on the writings of Tacitus and Cassio Dio but strategic relevance. There is an enormous amount of information about the Roman army, Roman strategic thinking and the Roman world and very little about Boudica and the natives. In that, I found the book disappointing.

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Publisher

Published

Genre

Century

Price
(US) $16.95
(UK) £9.99

ISBN
(UK) 9780752459097

Format
Paperback

Pages
256

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