Blood Tango

By

In a little over a week in October of 1945, Juan Perón went from vice-president of Argentina to a disgraced prisoner to the most powerful figure in the government, largely through the efforts of his mistress, radio actress Eva Duarte. Alfieri has created a murder mystery using the stabbing death of a fictional dressmaker’s assistant who wore Eva’s hand-me-down gowns and copied her dyed blonde hairstyle. Suspects include the victim’s abusive boyfriend and controlling father. Another theory was that she might have been mistaken for Evita and murdered by Perón’s enemies, particularly a left-wing trade unionist and a right-wing army lieutenant. By focusing on clothing, lipstick and hair rather than politics, the novel avoids the saint or sinner controversy. Although the plot resolution involves some ingenious turns, the structure allows only a superficial treatment of a fascinating character and a decisive historical moment. If you are interested in the glamour of this complex woman, you might still be better off with Madonna and the movie, also without political significance but with memorable music.

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12 of the best stories selected from the 2012 Historical Novel Society Short Story Award

Details

Publisher

Published

Genre

Century

Price
(US) $25.99

ISBN
(US) 9781250020482

Format
Hardback

Pages
272

Review

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