Lucinda Elliot

About me

Lucinda Elliot loves to write Gothic historical novels, which isn’t surprising as she was brought up in a series of isolated old houses her parents were renovating which would make ideal settings for a Gothic novel.
After living and working in London for many years, she now lives in mid Wales with her family.
She is fascinated by social history and women’s unwritten history.
She is intrigued by the notion of glorying in cliched themes in writing.
Her novel ‘That Scoundrel Emile Dubois’ set during the French Revoltion in France and North Wales is a take on an Ann Radcliffe type theme with vampires and time warps, while her next novel ‘Aleks Sager’s Daemon’ is about an author haunted by his own character from Tsarist Russia while ‘Ravensdale’ due out by April 2014 is set during 1792 in England is a spoof of the theme of the Disgraced Earl Framed for Murder Turns Outlaw.

From my website

Moral Transformations of a Scoundrel Through a Good Angel

At the moment I’m writing a story where the male protagonist is as wicked as Richardson’s Lovelace in ‘Clarissa’. He talks a good deal of reform, claiming that he wants a good woman to help him to reform – but sincerity isn’t exactly his strong point; as neither is a…

Characters in John Galsworthy’s ‘The Forstye Saga’ and Simone de Beauvoir;s ‘The Blood of Others’.

Mari Biella in a fascinating post on her blog comments on the many variables that can lead to a novel’s finding lasting fame or joining ‘The Great Slush Pile of History? http://maribiella.wordpress.com/2014/11/07/the-great-slush-pile-of-history I commented on this post (with dreadful typing; new keyboard, sorry) on how uninspiring I found John Galsworthy’s…

The Thin LIne Between the Frightening and the Ludicrous in Gothic

Dr Polidori wrote ‘The Vampyre’ perhaps the earliest British vampire story, for the competition set by Shelley and Byron and for which Mary Shelley wrote ‘Frankentstein’. Dr Polidori wrote ‘The Vampyre’ perhaps the earliest British vampire story, for a competition set by Shelley and Byron and for which Mary Shelley…

 
Share this member